LUKE SATTLER | DESIGN + ART DIRECTION
LUKE SATTLER | DESIGN + ART DIRECTION

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URBAN DUALITY: REDUX · NATURE · PROCESS + FINAL IMAGE I

Cities are insular by design, the organic is in constant conflict with the inorganic, they were built to separate us from the elements and the natural world which is actively kept at a distance. However, it is from this natural world we were formed and during moments of uninterrupted stillness when we at times feel most connected to ourselves and our surroundings. 

In this second part I aim to create doorways between these two worlds, to visually explore the complex relationship modern society has with nature through collage, how far we’ve advanced socially and technologically for better or worse, but also how far removed we now are from our origins, how we still long for these earthy roots.

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URBAN WORKBOOK: WIRE DRAWING EXERCISE

For this exercise I needed to create a drawing with one continuous line from wire based on one of the urban photographs taken for Lesson 1. The subject is a stranger I found myself sitting behind on the bus by chance. An elderly gentleman, deep in private contemplation during the repetitive rhythm of travel. I was drawn to the unique figure, his posture and body language in particular.

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URBAN PHOTOGRAPHS

Urban landscapes possess various aspects of duality which have long intrigued me. Insular by design, the organic is in constant conflict with the inorganic. Built to separate and protect mankind from the elements and the natural world which is actively kept at a distance, but without human presence and constant maintenance would in time weave around every street corner, force its way through the paved ground, envelop every man-made structure and reclaim the land we build our empires upon.

Similarly that detachment and dichotomy also extends itself to society. Physically living side by side with soaring population rates within and around cities, one would think a strong sense of community would be ever present but as people largely pass one another by, isolation and disconnectedness becomes increasingly prevalent in the modern world. I also think about the static nature of architecture at odds with the constant motion of traffic, workers, pedestrians, commuters busily moving to and fro below, the changing sky and weather patterns above, the passage of time in which generations come and go, walk the same footpaths, occupy the same buildings which stand quiet and de ant in the face of the rush of change.

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LETTERS IN THE ENVIRONMENT.

The purpose of this project is to explore the visual potential of letterforms. Supplied with a large-scale letter I was required to experiment with placement of my assigned letter and use it to interact with the environment around me. I was then required to record my findings photographically to use later as the central image for a typography exhibition poster design.

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RIGHT WHERE YOU ARE

The aspects of things that are most important for us are hidden, because of their simplicity and familiarity. One is unable to notice something – because it is always before one’s eyes. The hardest thing to see is often what is in front of our eyes. We usually only absorb what we want or need, we are likely to block out the rest. Restricted by habit, we glance around rather than look with acuity. Our eyes often sleep, until our mind wakes us with a question. Most of us look at a scene, rather than look into it. What we see and what we notice aren’t the same thing.

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